50th Anniversary Restoration of Sembène’s La Noire de… (Black Girl) (1966)

Having taught several of Ousmane Sembène’s films to college students, I’ve found Black Girl (1966) to be less popular with that audience than some of the Senegalese filmmaker’s later works. Many students enjoy the farcical humor of the neocolonial critique Xala (1975) and the move from satire to pathos in the tragic colonial critique Camp de … More 50th Anniversary Restoration of Sembène’s La Noire de… (Black Girl) (1966)

Distraction, Deep listening, and Devices in the Classroom 

“What are the pedagogical benefits of looking out the window in class, or looking into the screen of a digital device?” The new semester is humming along nicely, and I am relishing several uninterrupted moments to gather my thoughts after the initial rush of classlists and classroom swaps and name memorizations. This recent barrage of … More Distraction, Deep listening, and Devices in the Classroom 

What do professors look like, and do they visit outer space? (Week in Review)

Inspired by #ILookLikeAnEngineer, whereby debate over whether a cute and young bespectacled woman could ever connote “engineer” in our collective patriarchal imagination ensued, #ILookLikeAProfessor was born. A professor with tattoos? With brown skin? Really? Perhaps not as striking or as cutting edge in the humanities, where race and sexuality are important critical players, the hashtag … More What do professors look like, and do they visit outer space? (Week in Review)

Pula Film Festival Winner: Next to Me by Stevan Filipović

Even though screened at 11:00 pm mid festival week, the world premiere of Stevan Filipović and Hypnopolis Film’s Next to Me (Pored Mene) showed to a packed venue in the Pula Film Festival‘s 7,500 capacity Roman arena. The film lays down its political and artistic cards early on. High-school history teacher Olja (played by Hristina Popović) … More Pula Film Festival Winner: Next to Me by Stevan Filipović

Branko Schmidt’s Ungiven and Applause for Tito at 62nd Pula Film Festival’s Opening Night

The ruins of the Roman arena in Pula filled with professional attendees and local viewers on the Pula Film Festival’s opening night. Able to hold 12000 people, the arena was almost full. The festivities opened with speeches, fireworks, and a restored black and white documentary about the film festival from 1955. The audience laughed at … More Branko Schmidt’s Ungiven and Applause for Tito at 62nd Pula Film Festival’s Opening Night

On ruins, great and small (Week in Review)

How do we communicate loss? What remains after catastrophe, whether the broad reach of the natural disaster or the deep one of a broken relationship? This week I’ve reflected on two somewhat related experiences: a couple of visits to the Museum of Broken Relationships and the online responses to Cascadia’s predicted “Big One.” The New … More On ruins, great and small (Week in Review)

Srebrenica reflections and digital resources (Week in Review)

Tomorrow is the 20th anniversary of Srebrenica’s fall to Republika Srpska forces, which led within the following week to what the Hague’s criminal tribunal has since determined to be the massacre of 7000-8000 mostly male Bosnian Muslim civilians and POWs (ranging from minors to pensioners). In addition to proving how ineffective the UN peacekeeping was at protecting its … More Srebrenica reflections and digital resources (Week in Review)

In universes of their own: Sontag, Denis, Smith, Hopkinson (Week in Review)

Because of the timeliness of Susan Sontag’s cultural analyses, her divisive political capers, and her also high-profile female and male lovers (Annie Leibovitz, Lucinda Childs, Joseph Brodsky, etc), many focus on the private life of this public persona at the expense of her works. The new documentary Regarding Susan Sontag is no exception. In contrast, Steve Wasserman’s essay for the Los … More In universes of their own: Sontag, Denis, Smith, Hopkinson (Week in Review)

How to think about facts: immersion and speculation (Week in Review)

Tom Streithorst’s comparison of the techno-salvation imagined in Star Wars versus the post-eco disaster anarchy imagined in Mad Max shows how both reflect potential outcomes of current trends. He hopes for the first but predicts a third outcome, one exemplified by Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake: techno dystopia ruled by corporate elite. Read about it here. —  Do … More How to think about facts: immersion and speculation (Week in Review)